Murray-Dodge Café

THE MURRAY-DODGE CAFÉ NEWSLETTER : The Murray-Dodge Café was a staple of being on-campus at Princeton. Since the Café can’t host people right now, we decided to bring the Café to you. At least, virtually. A Murray-Dodge Café newsletter will come weekly with a Recipe of the Week, a specially highlighted Baker of the Week, and an activity or link to pass some of the quarantine boredom. We hope to bring a little bit of joy to Princeton students, even if it’s only virtual.   Make sure to follow us @murray_dodge_cafe!


October 26, 2020 Edition: This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom. This week’s specially highlighted baker is Matthew Iati, Class of 2022. Matthew’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Easy Pumpkin Pie Cookies!

RECIPE OF THE WEEK: 

EASY PUMPKIN PIE COOKIES

Delicious Cookies by our Baker of the Week

Delicious Cookies by our Baker of the Week!

INGREDIENTS

Cookie Base and Topping

1 pouch (1 lb 1.5 oz) Betty Crocker™ sugar cookie mix

¼ cup cold butter

4 oz (half of 8-oz package) cold cream cheese

Pumpkin Filling

3 oz cream cheese, well-softened 2 tablespoons sugar

3 tablespoons canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix)

2 teaspoons Gold Medal™ all-purpose flour

¼ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Heat oven to 350°F.
  2. Generously spray bottoms and sides of 24 regular-size muffin cups with cooking spray.
  3. Place cookie mix in large bowl.
  4. Cut in butter and 4 oz cream cheese, using pastry blender or fork, until mixture is crumbly. (Do not overmix.)
  5. Reserve 1 cup cookie mixture for topping; set aside.
  6. Firmly press 2 tablespoons remaining cookie mixture evenly into bottom of each muffin cup.
  7. In small bowl, add 3 oz cream cheese and stir until smooth.
  8. Add remaining pumpkin filling ingredients; mix well.
  9. Place 1 rounded teaspoon pumpkin filling in center of each cookie.
  10. Sprinkle each with 2 teaspoons reserved cookie topping.

A LITTLE BIO ON OUR BAKER OF THE WEEK:

Matthew grew up all over the East Coast. He was born in Connecticut, but went to boarding school in NYC at 9 years old, before finding himself at another boarding school in Boston for high school, after which his family moved to Washington, D.C. It’s no surprise that Matthew has no single ‘hometown’, but he definitely associates himself with the east coast.  Matthew was running a lot during the start of this fall semester, but has started formulating new exercises that feel fresh and exciting with the help of our very own Kamron. Of course, Matthew would rather be at school, but he feels that he’s made the best of a bad situation. For about a year and a half at Princeton, Matthew bounced between jobs. It was only until he started working at Murray-Dodge halfway through his sophomore year that he found a job he wanted to work in until he graduated. Matthew’s words: “Love at first cookie.” For Matthew, Murray-Dodge has an iconic status on campus: it’s a casual place to work, it has a distinct and different work environment. What’s not to love about cookies and friends and tea? When asked about his favorite cookie ingredient: “Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh. To be clear, it’s not raisins”. Matthew, though adamant that he’s not a “raisin guy,” loves white chocolate macadamia nut cookies, as well as any cookie with chunks of toffee.Matthew has no aspirations for professional baking. He likes baking with his current roommates, because of his ‘Nona-instinct’. When Matthew’s Nona visits, she brings buckets of Italian cookies: your Nona-instinct makes you want people to gain a few pounds under your watch. For Matthew, feeding people feels good. A part of Matthew wants to disappear into the Andes for six months post-graduation. He wants to seek adventure, life. Matthew did Bridge Year in Bolivia, he did OA, he’s gone on treks with his friends through Alaska and the Amazon. But of all places he’s been the Andes are out of this world. It’s probably his favorite place that he’s ever been.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment. We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself. In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week’s poem, recommended to us by Princeton student Hayden Burt:

POEM OF THE WEEK:  O Cheese by Donald Hall

In the pantry the dear dense cheeses, Cheddars and harsh Lancashires; Gorgonzola with its magnanimous manner; the clipped speech of Roquefort; and a head of Stilton that speaks in a sensuous riddling tongue like Druids.

O cheeses of gravity, cheeses of wistfulness, cheeses that weep continually because they know they will die. O cheeses of victory, cheeses wise in defeat, cheeses fat as a cushion, lolling in bed until noon.

Liederkranz ebullient, jumping like a small dog, noisy; Pont l’Évêque intellectual, and quite well informed; Emmentaler decent and loyal, a little deaf in the right ear; and Brie the revealing experience, instantaneous and profound.

O cheeses that dance in the moonlight, cheeses that mingle with sausages, cheeses of Stonehenge. O cheeses that are shy, that linger in the doorway, eyes looking down, cheeses spectacular as fireworks.

Reblochon openly sexual; Caerphilly like pine trees, small at the timberline; Port du Salut in love; Caprice des Dieux eloquent, tactful, like a thousand-year-old hostess; and Dolcelatte, always generous to a fault.

O village of cheeses, I make you this poem of cheeses, O family of cheeses, living together in pantries, O cheeses that keep to your own nature, like a lucky couple, this solitude, this energy, these bodies slowly dying.

If you’re like Matthew, and you’re looking for a little adventure in life before you settle down into a ‘real job,’ check out the links below! We’ve compiled a list of baking-related internships applicable for Summer 2021. Some are fun, some are serious: either way, you’ll have a great time exploring all the possibilities for a career in the agribusiness!

Cargill Food Science R & D Intern for Summer 2021

Cedar Fair Hospitality Internships 2021 Culinary Arts at Boca Raton October 2021

YummyJobs General Culinary Internships

You’ve reached the end of this fifth edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter! Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait. Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

 


OCTOBER 19 EDITION:  The Murray-Dodge Café has a new edition of its weekly newsletter! Our highlighted baker of the week, Kaylan Fomby, shares a recipe for Zucchini Bread.  Thank you for taking the time to read this fourth edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter! Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee.

This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom. This week’s specially highlighted baker is Kaylan Fomby, class of 2022.  Kaylan’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Zucchini Bread!

Kaylan’s recipe for Zucchini Bread is her aunt’s top-secret recipe. We’ve included a link to a more popular recipe (https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/6698/moms-zucchini-bread/).

A little bio on our Baker of the Week: Kaylan Fomby was born and raised in Alabama, and she moved to the suburbs of Georgia in first grade. While she liked Alabama for being laidback at times, Kaylan’s whole life is in Georgia now. Kaylan wants to shout-out CPS which has been an extremely helpful resource in this time, and is a resource everyone should take advantage of nowadays. Going outside has also helped. Nearby Kaylan's location is a meadow where she hangs out sometimes. She can play guitar, stargaze, talk with God, and just rant about her life. (As long as a cricket tournament isn’t going on.) 

Kaylan has a sentimental reason for her zucchini bread, and a flavor reason. As a child, Kaylan would spend time with her aunt, who also loves to bake. When Kaylan’s aunt would make zucchini bread, Kaylan was disgusted. Zucchini in bread? But once she tried it, she loved it. It tastes great, and it’s easy: you only need a whisk and you’re set.

One of the things Kaylan will remember the most, the thing she tells people when explaining what the cafe is, is that Murray-Dodge is one of the very few spaces to interact with the Princeton Community in two very special ways: firstly, at Murray-Dodge you encounter people you might otherwise never meet, and secondly, the context in which you meet these people is unique to the space itself.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment.

We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself.  In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week’s poem: Dark and Lovely After Take-Off (A Future) by Yona Harvey

Nobody straightens their hair anymore. Space trips & limited air supplies will get you conscious quick.

My shea-buttered braids glow planetary as I turn unconcerned, unburned by the pre-take-off bother.

“Leave it all behind,” my mother’d told me, sweeping the last specs of copper thread from her front porch steps &

just as quick, she turned her back to me. Why had she disappeared so suddenly behind that earthly door?

“Our people have made progress, but, perhaps,” she’d said once, “not enough to guarantee safe voyage

to the Great Beyond,” beyond where Jesus walked, rose, & ascended in the biblical tales that survived

above sprocket-punctured skylines &desert-dusted runways jeweled with wrenches & sheet metal scraps.

She’d no doubt exhale with relief to know ancient practice & belief died hard among the privileged, too.

Hundreds of missions passed & failed, but here I was strapped in my seat, anticipating—what exactly?

Curved in prayer or remembrance of a hurt so deep I couldn’t speak. Had that been me slammed to the ground, cuffed,

bulleted with pain as I danced with pain I couldn’t shake loose, even as the cops aimed pistols at me,

my body & mind both disconnected& connected & unable to freeze, though they shouted “freeze!”

like actors did on bad television. They’d watched & thought they recognized me, generic or bland,

without my mother weeping like Mary, Ruby, Idella, Geneava, or Ester stunned with a grief

our own countrymen refused to see, to acknowledge or cease initiating, instigating, &

even mocking in the social networks, ignorant frays bent and twisted like our DNA denied

but thriving and evident nonetheless—You better believe the last things I saw when far off lifted

were Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa…

& though it pained me to say it sooner: the unmistakable absence of the Great Barrier Reef.

 

Like Kaylan says, going outside nowadays is imperative. Included below are some easy recipes you can enjoy outdoors at a ~properly socially-distanced~ gathering with family!

https://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/g4308/campfire-desserts/

http://www.lovetheoutdoors.com/camping/dessert_recipes.htm (We really wanna try the M&M Smores)

https://veganonboard.com/campfire-bread-on-a-stick-recipe/ (Who doesn’t love bread on a stick?)

You’ve reached the end of this fourth edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter!  Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait.  Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

P.S.  If you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu

 


OCTOBER 12, 2020 EDITION: Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee. This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom. This week’s specially highlighted baker is Amina Elgamal, class of 2022. Amina’s chosen Recipe of the Week is the Simple Ten-Step Pancakes! For those of us who really want to bake but can’t stand all the measuring and pouring and messiness, this recipe for the easiest fluffy pancakes you’ve ever made in ten, simple steps needs to be your go-to.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
    Pancakes!

    Delicious Pancakes!

  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for cooking
  • Powdered sugar or maple syrup, for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Stir together the flour, the sugar, the baking powder, and salt in a large bowl.
  2. Mix in the milk, the eggs, and the vegetable oil. A few lumps are fine!
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat while the batter settles.
  4. Swirl 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil around the pan to coat it.
  5. Add 3 separate portions of the batter to the pan, using 2 tablespoons of batter for each portion.
  6. Cook until bubbles appear on the surface, the edges begin to look dry, and the bottoms are golden-brown. Around 3 minutes.
  7. Flip the pancakes and cook until the second sides are golden-brown, 2 to 3 minutes more.
  8. Transfer to a warm oven or plate.
  9. Smear a thin layer of butter or margarine in between each layer of your pancake stack.
  10. Repeat using more oil until you are out of batter.

A LITTLE BIO ON OUR BAKER OF THE WEEK: Amina grew up in Dublin, Ohio, a place she describes as fun and chill, although with not much to do there. Her parents are both from Egypt: her dad teaches electrical engineering at Ohio State University and her mom works a consulting job for medical business. She wasn’t aware of it, but Amina is a Gemini. We read her the typical Gemini personality traits and asked her if she identified with them. Her response? “Give me a couple months and I’ll get back to you.” Amina holds a firm stance when it comes to the ideal mix-in: Chocolate-chips, 100%. The chocolate-chip cookie is the most convenient vessel for eating a melted chocolate bar. Princeton selects for the trait of competition, according to Amina. You can feel that pressure in a library. Murray-Dodge had good energy: it was the place where your friends could come and sit and chat, while you all ate cookies. Amina relaxes by making things. Though baking alone can be painful, making cookies is meditative in a way. It turns the brain off. She recommends finding a place where you can assign the role of relaxation. Now, in quarantine, we take our exams in our bedrooms. You can’t be stuck in one place all the time, Amina says. For post-graduation, Amina is thinking maybe graduate school, maybe employment, maybe law  school. She thinks on how the pandemic will affect the social lives of young adults: if the job sector shifts home, how will the timeline of our lives be redirected?

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment. We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself. In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place. This week’s poem:

EN SU LLAMA MORTAL BY PABLO NERUDA

En su llama mortal la luz te envuelve. Absorta, pálida doliente, así situada contra las viejas helices del crepúsculo que en torno a ti da vueltas.

Muda, mi amiga, sola en lo solitario de esta hora de muertes y llena de las vidas del fuego, pura heredera del día destruido.

Del sol cae un racimo en tu vestido oscuro. De la noche las grandes raíces crecen de subito desde tu alma, y a lo exterior regresan las cosas en ti ocultas, de modo que un pueblo pálido y azul de ti recién nacido se alimenta.

Oh grandiosa y fecunda y magnética esclava del círculo que en negro y dorado sucede: erguida, trata y logra una creación tan viva que sucumben sus flores, y llena es de tristeza.

THE LIGHT WRAPS YOU - TRANS. W.S. MERWIN

The light wraps you in its mortal flame. Abstracted pale mourner, standing that way against the old propellers of the twilight that revolves around you.

Speechless, my friend, alone in the loneliness of this hour of the dead and filled with the lives of fire, pure heir of the ruined day.

A bough of fruit falls from the sun on your dark garment. The great roots of night grow suddenly from your soul, and the things that hide in you come out again so that a blue and pallid people, your newly born, takes nourishment.

Oh magnificent and fecund and magnetic slave of the circle that moves in turn through black and gold rise, lead and possess a creation so rich in life that its flowers perish, and it is full of sadness.

If you want more poetry, check out All Hallows by Louise Glück. Here at Murray-Dodge, we have to celebrate her recent win of the Nobel Prize in Literature. She is the 16th woman to win the Nobel for Literature out of a list of 113 recipients. She is the third American to receive the prize in the past 30 years, a short list which includes Bob Dylan and our very own Toni Morrison. Our recommended poem shows off her subtle voice, her moody atmospheres, and her introspective gaze. It is the perfect poem for mid-October.

If you’re interested in doing more baking than reading—after all, as Amina says, sometimes you have to turn off your brain and work with your hands—check out the links below! This especially goes out to everyone who’s had a rough midterm season. Nobody told us Zoom University was going to be this way. Sometimes, you gotta watch YouTube and procrastinate, you just gotta.

The chemistry of cookies – Stephanie Warren (4.30 mins)

4 levels of Chocolate Chip Cookies: Amateur to Food Scientist | Epicurious (10.13 mins) – At Murray-Dodge, we love the Epicurious channel on YouTube!

Pastry Chef Attempts to Make Gourmet Takis | Gourmet Makes | Bon Appétit (33.00 mins) – We also really love Takis.

You’ve reached the end of this third edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter! Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait. Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

P.S.   If you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu


October 5, 2020 Edition: This week’s specially highlighted Baker is Nisha Lakhiani, class of 2021. Nisha’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Pumpkin Bread. With September slowly cooling down into October, Nisha wanted a baked good with an atmosphere for autumn!

Recipe of the Week: Pumpkin Bread (in one bowl)

Pumpkin Bread

Pumpkin Bread

1 1/2 cup pumpkin purée

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 vegetable oil

1/3 cup milk

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

Make sure everything is mixed well together

In another bowl:

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp salt

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg (optional)

1/2 tsp ground ginger (optional) Mix everything together.

Gradually pour dry flour mixture into pumpkin mixture, stirring well before you add more into the bowl. Stir until all ingredients are completely combined. Adding nuts is optional!

Grease an 8x4 loaf pan and pour mixture in.

Bake at 350F for 55 minutes, or until done and toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Let cool for 5-10 minutes before removing from pan and let cool on a rack. You can serve with a nice homemade glaze, cream cheese frosting, or just by itself if you like it simple!

NOTES: if you don’t have nutmeg or ginger, or many spices, or you don’t want to buy a whole container, you can buy pumpkin pie mix at the grocery store, instead of plain pumpkin purée. The pie mix is essentially the same, but it comes prepared with spices already. That’s what I did. But I added some extra cinnamon and vanilla in there anyway!

A little bit of a bio for the Baker of the Week:

Nisha was born and raised in Texas, just like her mom. Her dad moved to Texas from India in his 20s, and the rest was history. Since she was a freshman, the cafe was Nisha’s go-to spot to hang out and do schoolwork, even if she wasn’t working shifts. What Nisha likes most about the café is how it can be so different for so many people. For first-timers, it has surprise to it. For regulars, it’s their cozy spot to retreat. Despite the Pumpkin Bread, Nisha’s biggest hit in the café was a pistachio chocolate-chip cookie she experimented with her sophomore year. To cope with quarantine, Nisha first made it a priority to stay occupied. She learned a dance, exercised, binged TV shows, and even started studying for the LSAT! But Nisha finally landed on cooking as a way to destress, spend more time with her mom, and try out new recipes. Nisha thinks of making food as a kind of love language. It’s a way to bring family and friends together.

And as an activity for the week, check out studentrecipes.com. The website has tons of recipes, articles, and online communities for college students who need to cook for themselves. It’s perfect for the Princeton student who just moved out of their parents’ house. If you liked our newsletter, stay tuned for more throughout the semester! We’re going to have more Recipes of the Week, more featured Bakers, more fun links and activities, and we’ll even be hosting competitions as the semester goes on. Though Murray-Dodge can’t be a physical home for students this semester, it can still be a community. We hope this newsletter will tide over those upperclassmen who are dying for a cookie and introduce the new freshmen to one of the happiest spots on campus.

Happy Baking,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers


 

Murray-Dodge Café

Murray-Dodge Café Entrance facing the Art Museum

The Murray-Dodge Café is an informal, underground meeting place that offers FREE fresh-baked, homemade cookies, coffee and tea.  All Princeton University students are welcome!   Our dedicated and experienced student staff helps to make this a great place to take a study break, meet some new friends, or reconnect with old ones!  The Café also hosts special events such as musical performances and poetry readings.   Our entrance is located on the Art Museum side of Dodge Hall.  The kindest place on campus!  However, the Café is currently closed due to COVID-19.

 

Murray-Dodge Café Holiday Fun - December  2017

Murray-Dodge Café Holiday Fun - December  2017

Murray-Dodge Café Holiday Fun - December  2017

 

Murray-Dodge Café staff pumpkin picking - Fall 2017

Murray-Dodge Café staff pumpkin picking - Fall 2017

Murray-Dodge Café staff pumpkin picking - Fall 2017

Interior of the Cafe 

Murray-Dodge Café