Murray-Dodge Café

THE MURRAY-DODGE CAFÉ NEWSLETTER : The Murray-Dodge Café was a staple of being on-campus at Princeton. Since the Café can’t host people right now, we decided to bring the Café to you. At least, virtually. A Murray-Dodge Café newsletter will come weekly with a Recipe of the Week, a specially highlighted Baker of the Week, and an activity or link to pass some of the quarantine boredom. We hope to bring a little bit of joy to Princeton students, even if it’s only virtual.   Make sure to follow us @murray_dodge_cafe!



March 22: Edition: The Murray-Dodge Café has a new edition of its weekly newsletter! Our highlighted baker of the week, Ricky Lin, shares a recipe for Mint Chocolate Chip Pudding Cookies.   

Make sure to follow us @murray_dodge_cafe!

Thank you for taking the time to read this third spring edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter!

Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee.

This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom.

This week’s specially highlighted baker is Ricky Lin, class of 2023.  

Ricky’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Mint Chocolate Chip Pudding Cookies

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened (1 stick)
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup sour cream (or plain yogurt)
  • 1 small box instant vanilla pudding mix (3.4 oz)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp mint extract
  • 3 drops blue coloring + 10-15 drops green coloring
  • 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips*

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Cream together sugar and butter. Add egg, sour cream and pudding mix.
  2. In a small bowl, combine flour, salt & baking soda.
  3. Incorporate flour mixture into the pudding mixture and mix until well combined.  Add mint extract and food coloring until desired color is achieved.
  4. Add in chocolate chips - Ricky used 3/4 cup chocolate chunks, 3/4 cup regular chocolate chips and 1/2 cup Andes baking bits. Any combination is wonderful, but note that while the Andes mint baking pieces add an incredible flavor, they kind of disappear in the cookies. So add them in addition to the 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips, if you opt to put them in!
  5. Drop by rounded tablespoonfuls onto a greased cookie sheet.
  6. Bake at 375 for 10 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and enjoy! Yields 3 dozen cookies.

A little bio on our Baker of the Week:

Ricky is from Brooklyn. During the city’s quarantine, he’s had a huge backlog of games and TV shows to catch up on, not to mention the ones he’s revisited. Ricky says it also helps talking random garbage with friends.

A person smiling for the camera

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Ricky chose his recipe for Mint Chocolate Chip Pudding Cookies, because mint extract is his favorite ingredient. He says that everyone loves regular chocolate chip, but the dough is too bland for him. The mint gives the cookie an edge. Ricky admits it can be an acquired taste. He wanted to do pudding cookies specifically, too, because the pudding will make for a much softer cookie.

 

Making food for other people is such a universal way to provide service for people, Ricky says. Getting paid to make people feel welcome is such a dream. And, for Ricky, the process of making cookies itself is therapeutic. It’s a nice break from Princeton coursework to mix dough by hand and watch it rise into cookies while in the oven.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment.

This week’s poem:  Telescope  by Louise Glück

There is a moment after you move your eye away
when you forget where you are
because you’ve been living, it seems,
somewhere else, in the silence of the night sky.

You’ve stopped being here in the world.
You’re in a different place,
a place where human life has no meaning.

You’re not a creature in body.
You exist as the stars exist,
participating in their stillness, their immensity.

Then you’re in the world again.
At night, on the cold hill,
taking the telescope apart.

You realize afterward
not that the image is false
but the relation is false.

You see again how far away
every thing is from every other thing.

(P.S. if you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu)

Check out these apps below for helpful baking resources:

Perfect Bake – This interactive app leads you through the process of baking your own recipes.

Epicurious – Choose from thousands of the best recipes culled by peer review.

CookpadThis Android app lets users create a social media platform around daily recipes.

You’ve reached the end of this third spring edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter!

Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait.

Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers


March 8, 2021 Edition: The Murray-Dodge Café has a new edition of its weekly newsletter! Our highlighted baker of the week, Gabrielle Sudilovsky, shares a recipe for Peach Crumble.   

Make sure to follow us @murray_dodge_cafe!

Thank you for taking the time to read this second spring edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter!

Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee.

This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom.

This week’s specially highlighted baker is Gabrielle Sudilovsky, class of 2022.  

Gabrielle’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Peach Crumble!

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 cups sliced fresh peachesMurray-Dodge Cafe
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup cold butter
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup rolled oats

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. Arrange peaches evenly in an 8x8-inch baking dish.
  3. Mix flour, brown sugar, butter, cinnamon, and salt in a bowl using until crumbled together.
  4. Fold oats into mixture
  5. Sprinkle and press topping into peaches.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven until topping is lightly browned, about 30 minutes.

A little bio on our Baker of the Week:Gabrielle Sudilovsky

Gabrielle is from a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. When on the East Coast, she feels she has to defend the Midwest rather aggressively, even though she doesn’t think of her town as super interesting. Fun fact: her suburb, Solon, shares its name with a famous Greek philosopher (though the philosopher is not the town’s namesake). 

For Gabrielle, seeing people in a socially distanced way has been helpful. It’s always good to have the presence of another human. Her music taste has also been changing a lot. The pandemic has forced everyone to sit with their own thoughts more, so the abundance of self-reflection has led to a lot of little developments, like in music. 

Though Gabrielle likes baking, she doesn’t explore it as much as she’d like. Luckily, she’s able to bake, because there is a kitchen directly beneath her room. It’s not as much access to a kitchen as she had last semester in Philadelphia, however. The thing Gabrielle loves best about being an employee at Murray-Dodge is that she can bake cookies without a recipe but from her mind. 

Her post-graduation plans are to attend medical school and take the route to become a physician. In terms of specialty, she’s not really sure. She points out there’s a lot of problems with medicine, including marginalization, and wants to serve as a provider with various underrepresented and poorly understood identities. She also is simply passionate about science and using it to help people.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment.

We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself.

In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week features a poem by a Princeton undergraduate, Danielle Ranucci:

 

Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Croissant   by Danielle Ranucci

I

Among twenty Parisian confections,   

The only lovely sight   

Was the curve of the croissant.   

II

I was of three minds,   

Like a croissant   

In which there are three parts.   

III

The croissant crested through the crumbling air.   

It was a small part of the moon.   

IV

A man and a woman   

Are one.   

A man and a woman and a croissant   

Are one.   

V

I do not know which to prefer,   

The beauty of fullness   

Or the beauty of vanishment,   

The croissant sighted   

Or just after.   

VI

Crumbs crowded the wide table   

With barbaric ruination.   

The shadow of the croissant   

Crossed it, to and fro.   

The taste   

Traced in the absence   

An indecipherable bliss.   

VII

O greedy men of Louis XIV,   

Why do you imagine golden bounty?   

Do you not see how the croissant   

enriches the mouths   

Of all those about you?   

VIII

I know Notre Dame   

And lucid, heavenly bells;   

But I know, too,   

That the croissant is involved   

In what I know.   

IX

When the croissant crumbled out of sight,   

It marked the end   

Of one of many croissants.   

X

At the sight of croissants   

Resting in the moonlight,   

Even the fish of the Seine   

Would cry out hungrily.   

XI

Roland strode over the French alps   

In a bedraggled pair of boots.   

Once, a joy pierced him,   

In that he mistook   

The tips of his shoes

For croissants.   

XII

The Marseillaise is playing.

The croissant must be baking.   

XIII

It was evening all afternoon.   

It was snowing   

And it was going to snow.   

The croissant glowed   

On the café-table.

(P.S. if you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu)

Per Gabrielle’s note that baking is not so easy in a college dorm room, here are some quick and easy recipe links for dorm room baking:

You’ve reached the end of the second spring edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter!

Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait.

Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers


Feb 22, 2021  Edition:  Thank you for taking the time to read the first spring edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter! Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee. This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week!

This week’s specially highlighted baker is Kamron Soldozy, class of 2022.

Kamron’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Granola BarsGranola Bar

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 cups rolled oats (not quick or instant)

2 Tablespoons brown sugar

1/4 cup flaked sweetened coconut

1/3 cup vegetable oil (I use avocado oil)

1/3 cup honey

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup of “extras” – Kamron likes chopped

toasted walnuts, almonds & pecans, dried

cherries & chocolate chips (mini or regular)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 325° F.

2. Line a 9” x 9” square pan with 2 criss-cross sheets of parchment paper (not foil) leaving extra

overhang on all sides.

3. Combine oats, brown sugar, coconut and extras in a large bowl.

4. Combine honey, oil, and vanilla in a measuring cup.

5. Add honey mixture to oat mixture and take time to combine thoroughly - about a minute.

6. Spread in baking pan, pressing down very firmly. Try pressing down with the back of a spatula.

7. Bake for 30 minutes. Cool completely in pan. (mine takes an hour to cool on a cooling rack)

8. Remove from pan (using parchment handles) to cutting board. Remove paper and cut into bars.

A little bio on our Baker of the Week:

Kamron is from Ashburn, Virginia, which is what he calls a “fun suburb.” He’s a Sagittarius, though he’s not sure what that means, and he knows a bit more about his enneagram type: 2w3. Quarantine has been challenging for everyone, but Kamron finds that even just a little investment in self-care goes a long way. For example, he won’t want to get out of his chair, but 5 minutes into a walk, he’s happy he decided to get active, however briefly. The same is true for talking to friends: it can feel effortful, but it pays off. Murray-Dodge gained Kamron as an employee his freshman year, and he has many favorite memories of the café. Once, a local Princetonian wanted to tip Kamron for making them a coffee. Murray-Dodge doesn’t accept tips, so instead Kamron made a donation jar. That day, roughly $20 was raised for the café’s operating budget! The friendly ambience, environment, and artistry of the café is a major appeal to Kamron. For Kamron, Murray-Dodge is the campus’ happy place. Students are told often about opportunities and events for improving student life on campus, such as making coursework more manageable. Murray-Dodge, though grounded in free cookies and drinks, is the gem of all these ideas specific to Princeton student life. It’s something everyone can love. Kamron is planning on an MD-PhD in Neuroscience. This is, for him, a sufficiently short answer, considering his chosen career path covers at least 8 years of his post-graduate life. He wants to help bridge medical practice and research, allowing new treatment methods to evolve out of brain research.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment. We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself. In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week’s poem: I Have Seen Black Hands by Richard Wright

I am black and I have seen black hands, millions and millions of them—

Out of millions of bundles of wool and flannel tiny black fingers have reached restlessly and hungrily for life.

Reached out for the black nipples at the black breasts of black mothers,

And they've held red, green, blue, yellow, orange, white, and purple toys in the childish

grips of possession,

And chocolate drops, peppermint sticks, lollypops, wineballs, ice cream cones, and

sugared cookies in fingers sticky and gummy,

And they've held balls and bats and gloves and marbles and jack-knives and slingshots

and spinning tops in the thrill of sport and play,

And pennies and nickels and dimes and quarters and sometimes on New Year's, Easter,

Lincoln's Birthday, May Day, a brand new green dollar bill,

They've held pens and rulers and maps and tablets and books in palms spotted and

smeared with ink,

And they've held dice and cards and half-pint flasks and cue sticks and cigars and

cigarettes in the pride of new maturity . . .

II

I am black and I have seen black hands, millions and millions of them—

They were tired and awkward and calloused and grimy and covered with hangnails,

And they were caught in the fast-moving belts of machines and snagged and smashed

and crushed,

And they jerked up and down at the throbbing machines massing taller and taller the

heaps of gold in the banks of bosses,

And they piled higher and higher the steel, iron, the lumber, wheat, rye, the oats, corn,

the cotton, the wool, the oil, the coal, the meat, the fruit, the glass, and the stone

until there was too much to be used,

And they grabbed guns and slung them on their shoulders and marched and groped in

trenches and fought and killed and conquered nations who were customers for the

goods black hands had made.

And again black hands stacked goods higher and higher until there was too much to

be used,

And then the black hands held trembling at the factory gates the dreaded lay-off slip,

And the black hands hung idle and swung empty and grew soft and got weak and

bony from unemployment and starvation,

And they grew nervous and sweaty, and opened and shut in anguish and doubt and

hesitation and irresolution . . .

III

I am black and I have seen black hands, millions and millions of them—

Reaching hesitantly out of days of slow death for the goods they had made, but the

bosses warned that the goods were private and did not belong to them,

And the black hands struck desperately out in defence of life and there was blood, but

the enraged bosses decreed that this too was wrong,

And the black hands felt the cold steel bars of the prison they had made, in despair

tested their strength and found that they could neither bend nor break them,

And the black hands fought and scratched and held back but a thousand white hands

took them and tied them,

And the black hands lifted palms in mute and futile supplication to the sodden faces of

mobs wild in the revelries of sadism,

And the black hands strained and clawed and struggled in vain at the noose that

tightened about the black throat,

And the black hands waved and beat fearfully at the tall flames that cooked and

charred the black flesh . . .

IV

I am black and I have seen black hands

Raised in fists of revolt, side by side with the white fists of white workers,

And some day—and it is only this which sustains me—

Some day there shall be millions and millions of them,

On some red day in a burst of fists on a new horizon!

*

(P.S. if you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu)

You’ve reached the end of this first spring edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter! Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait. Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

 


Dec 21, 2020 Edition:  The Murray-Dodge Café has a semester’s end edition of its weekly newsletter! Check below for recipes for double chocolate-chip muffins, mint chocolate cookies, homemade Milano cookies, and holiday biscotti!

Make sure to follow us @murray_dodge_cafe!

Thank you for taking the time to read this semester’s end edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter!

Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee.

This week, we’re proud to present a round of four recipes—sans Baker of the Week—to celebrate the end of Princeton’s first, and with luck last, virtual semester.

DOUBLE CHOCOLATE-CHIP MUFFINS

First, from one of our newer bakers, Juliet Sturge, a recipe for double chocolate-chip muffins and a special message:

Hello everyone! Hope all is well and finals were good for everyone. If you are missing late meal muffins as much as I am you should try this recipe:) I guarantee it’ll be easy and a crowd pleaser!!

Ingredients:

1/2 cup butter (1 stick, or 1/2 stick plus 1/4 c oil works just as well)

1 1/4 cup buttermilk (I make my own: any type of milk + ~ 1tbsp. White vinegar and let it sit for 5 min)

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla

2 c flour

3/4 cup dutch processed cocoa (it really makes a big difference to use dutch processed, I recommenced Droste, but obviously use whatever you have)

1 overflowing cup of sugar (add an extra 1/4 c if you like things sweeter)

2 1/2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsp of espresso powder or instant coffee (can definitely leave out if you don’t have any)

~1 cup of chocolate chips or chunks

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425 F

Melt butter and let it cool. Then add in eggs, buttermilk, oil, coffee, and vanilla.

In another bowl, mix flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, and salt, Sift if needed (sometimes cocoa can be really clumpy). Then add the sugar.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and mix well (I think using a spatula works the best and prevents overtaxing). Right when it is all combined, stop mixing!! The batter should be pretty thick. Then add in the chocolate chips.

Scoop batter into a prepared cupcake tin almost all the way to the top. I find this recipe makes about 15 muffins. I also always top with extra chocolate chips.

Bake for three minutes then reduce the temperature to 350 F for another 12-18 minutes (I check at 12 but usually takes closer to 16-17 for me) or until a toothpick can come out clean. Let them cool and enjoy!

HOMEMADE MILANO COOKIES

Up next, one of two recommended recipes from Joanne Campagnoli-Sismondo, the overseer of the Murray-Dodge Café in the Office of Religious Life. She advises making the ganache if you want a crispier cookie, but you can use Nutella if you prefer it on the softer side!

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups butter, room temperature

¾ cup sugar

1 ⅓ cup confectioner's sugar

1 cup egg whites (about 8)

1 ½ tsp vanilla

2 ⅔ cups flour ganache

1 cup heavy cream

8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degree F. Cut 2 pieces of parchment paper and using a ruler draw 12, 2 ½ inch lines spaced about 3 inches apart. Place the papers written side down onto 2 baking sheets and set aside.

In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat butter, sugar, and confectioner's sugar with the paddle attachment until light and fluffy, about 3-5 minutes. Add egg whites and vanilla and mix until combined. Mix in flour.

Transfer the batter to a large piping bag fitted with a ½ inch round tip. Pipe the batter onto the lined baking sheets using the guides you marked earlier.

Bake in preheated oven for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack. Repeat with remaining batter.

To make the ganache, place chopped chocolate in a medium size bowl. Heat heavy cream in a saucepan until it begins to simmer (do not let it boil!). Pour over chocolate and let sit 2-3 minutes. Gently stir until combined and chocolate has completely melted. Allow to cool and thicken until spreadable consistency.

To assemble the cookies, spread the ganache onto the flat side of one cookie and sandwich with the flat side of another cookie. Repeat with remaining cookies.

HOLIDAY BISCOTTI

Another recommendation by Joanne, who suggests trying the biscotti without the frosting!

Ingredients:

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

3/4 cup sugar

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 large eggs

3/4 cup pistachios, coarsely chopped

2/3 cup dried cranberries

12 ounces good-quality white chocolate, chopped

Red and green sugar crystals, for garnish

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Line a heavy large baking sheet with parchment paper. Whisk the flour and baking powder in a medium bowl to blend. Using an electric mixer, beat the sugar, butter, lemon zest, and salt in a large bowl to blend. Beat in the eggs 1 at a time. Add the flour mixture and beat just until blended. Stir in the pistachios and cranberries.

Form the dough into a 13-inch long, 3-inch wide log on the prepared baking sheet. Bake until light golden, about 40 minutes. Cool for 30 minutes.

Place the log on the cutting board. Using a sharp serrated knife, cut the log on a diagonal into 1/2 to 3/4-inch-thick slices. Arrange the biscotti, cut side down, on the baking sheet. Bake the biscotti until they are pale golden, about 15 minutes. Transfer the biscotti to a rack and cool completely.

Stir the chocolate in a bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water until the chocolate melts. Dip half of the biscotti into the melted chocolate. Gently shake off the excess chocolate. Place the biscotti on the baking sheet for the chocolate to set. Sprinkle with the sugar crystals. Refrigerate until the chocolate is firm, about 35 minutes.

The biscotti can be made ahead. Store them in an airtight container up to 4 days, or wrap them in foil and freeze in resealable plastic bags up to 3 weeks.

MINT CHOCOLATE COOKIES

And a final recipe for mint chocolate cookies from another of our own bakers, Ricky Lin, who says he will continue to spread the word about mint chocolate cookies.

Ingredients:

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup butter softened (1 stick)

1 egg

1/2 cup sour cream

1 small box instant vanilla pudding mix 3.4 oz

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp baking soda

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 tsp mint extract

3 drops blue coloring + 10-15 drops green coloring

1 1/2 cups chocolate chips*

Instructions:

Cream together sugar and butter. Add egg, sour cream and pudding mix. In a small bowl, combine flour, salt & baking soda. Incorporate flour mixture into the pudding mixture and mix until well combined. Add mint extract and food coloring until desired color is achieved.

Add in chocolate chips. *I used 3/4 cup chocolate chunks, 3/4 cup regular chocolate chips and 1/2 cup Andes baking bits. Any combination is wonderful, but note that while the Andes mint baking pieces add an incredible flavor, they kind of disappear in the cookies. So add them in addition to the 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips, if you opt to put them in!

Drop by rounded tablespoonfuls onto greased cookie sheet.

Bake at 375 for 10 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and enjoy!

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment.

We’re proud to include a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself.  In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week, we’ve decided to include two poems: Princeton’s own Tracy K. Smith’s “The Soul”, and Billy Collins’ “The First Night”

The Soul by Tracy K. Smith

The voice is clean. Has heft. Like stones Dropped in still water, or tossed

One after the other at a low wall. Chipping away at what pushes back.

Not always making a dent, but keeping at it. And the silence around it is a door

Punched through with light. A garment That attests to breasts, the privacy

Between thighs. The body is what we lean toward, Tensing as it darts, dancing away.

But it’s the voice that enters us. Even Saying nothing. Even saying nothing Over and over absently to itself.

The First Night by Billy Collins

“The worst thing about death must be the first night.”– Jose Ramón Jiménez

Before I opened you, Jiménez,

it never occurred to me that day and night

would continue to circle each other in the ring of death,

but now you have me wondering

if there will also be a sun and a moon

and will the dead gather to watch them rise and set

then repair, each soul alone,

to some ghastly equivalent of a bed. Or will the first night be the only night,

a long darkness for which we have no other name? How feeble our vocabulary in the face of death, How impossible to write it down.

This is where language will stop,

the horse we have ridden all our lives rearing up at the edge of a dizzying cliff.

The word that was in the beginning and the word that was made flesh— those and all other words will cease.

Even now, reading you on this trellised porch,

how can I describe a sun that will shine after death?

But it is enough to frighten me

into paying more attention to the world’s day-moon, to sunlight bright on water

or fragmented in a grove of trees,

and to look more closely here at these small leaves, these sentinel thorns,

whose employment it is to guard the rose.

You’ve reached the end of this semester’s end edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter!

Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this final week’s newsletter with recipes and poems can tide you over through winter break and beyond until campus life resumes.

Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no! With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

(P.S. if you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu)

 


Nov 23, 2020 Issue: This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom.  

This week’s specially highlighted baker is Walker Stamps, class of 2022  and Walker’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Banana Bread! 


INGREDIENTS 

•    1 cup of regular flour

Bananas

Bananas!


•    1/2 cup of confectioners (or regular) sugar
•    1/2 cup of brown sugar
•    2 Eggs, beaten
•    2 tsp Chili Powder (Or dried spices such as nutmeg)
•    3 Bananas, mashed, 1 banana sliced
•    1tbsp Baking Soda
•    2tsp Vanilla Extract
•    1 stick of butter

Instructions

1.    Preheat oven to 425.
2.    Soften butter in the microwave.
3.    Mix butter with eggs, mashed bananas, and vanilla.
4.    In a large bowl mix in the dry ingredients (sugar, flour, chili powder, baking soda).
5.    Put in preheated oven for 30-35 minutes or until the bread is fluffy and crisped.
6.    Top with cinnamon sugar if preferred.
7.    Enjoy.

A little bio on our Baker of the Week:

Walker is originally from Dahlonega, GA but is currently living in a townhouse in Philadelphia. He’s rooming with other juniors and has been able to explore the city—being conscious of COVID-19—and trying out some great restaurants—outdoor dining is a great time.

Walker has been going on a lot more runs, has been cooking a bunch more, and recently has been catching up a bit on movies/TV. He finished The Office, a show he wanted to get into for a while and quarantine finally gave him the time to finish it all.

Walker chose to bake a banana bread—it seemed to him like everyone at the beginning of quarantine was baking this recipe and posting it on social media. Walker thought it was the perfect thing to do. He added a bit of his signature touch by mixing in spicy chilis—which are underappreciated in baking—and topping it off with banana slices. The end result is extremely tasty!

He’s been baking at the Café since he was a freshman. His older sister, who was a senior at the time and had worked at the Café previously, hyped up the job to him. Becoming a baker at MD was a fantastic choice—it is really one of the best jobs on campus. Walker gets to bake cookies, which is a lot of fun, but also helps contribute to the unique space of MD. He thinks having such a calm and relaxed space in the relative center of campus is truly kind of awesome and being a baker there more so!

Walker’s favorite part of MD Cafe is its later hours, and how nice it is to be there at any time in the afternoon. There's always people relaxing, having a good time, and sometimes studying in a very warm and welcoming basement. Something kind of cool and unique about the cafe is the chalk walls. Walker has been pleasantly surprised at how people have transformed them artistically over the years into real art that he enjoys looking at.

After graduation, which is still a bit far out, Walker would like to work in finance and live in New York City. He also wants to continue being involved in some of the things he’s enjoyed during college—like taking dance classes or volunteering.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment.

Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself. In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week’s poem:   by Nabila Lovelace

The S in “I Loves You, Porgy” makes me think plurality. Maybe I can love you with many selves. Or. I love all the Porgys. Even as a colloquialism: a queering of love as singular. English is a strange language because I loves and He loves are not both grammarly. I loves you, Porgy. Better to ask what man is not, Porgy. The beauty of Nina’s Porgy distorts gravity. Don’t let him take me. The ceiling is in the floor. There is one name I cannot say. Who is _______ now? Beauty, a proposal on refuse. Disposal. Nina’s eyes know a fist too well. Not well enough. Pick one out a lineup.

Like Walker said above, quarantine is a great time to get into some new TV shows (or some old ones)—check out the baking-themed shows recommended below! 
The Great British Baking Show – if you haven’t heard of this show, you’ve been living under a rock. But the content lives up to the hype! On Netflix.  
Barefoot Contessa – not as well-known a show, but a classic of cooking. On Hulu.  
Gordon Ramsay’s Ultimate Cookery Course – the myth, the man, the legend, Gordon Ramsay. On Amazon.

You’ve reached the end of this seventh edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter!  Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait.   Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,   Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers 

 


Walker is originally from Dahlonega, GA but is currently living in a townhouse in Philadelphia. He’s rooming with other juniors and has been able to explore the city—being conscious of COVID-19—and trying out some great restaurants—outdoor dining is a great time.

Halloween 2020 Edition: The Murray-Dodge Café has a Halloween edition of its weekly newsletter! The Murray-Dodge supervisors share recipes for Protein Pumpkins and Caramel Apples. Thank you for taking the time to read this Halloween edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter! Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee.  This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom.  This week’s specially highlighted bakers are Kamron Soldozy, Class of 2022, and Andrew Tye, Class of 2021.

KAMRON’S CHOSEN RECIPE OF THE WEEK:  PROTEIN PUMPKINS!

INGREDIENTS

Protein Pumpkins

Protein Pumpkins

  • Cacao powder: “I literally never measure this. Also every cacao powder is different, some are really strong, and some aren’t. Try anywhere from 1-4 servings, apparently I use 3.”
  • Nut Butter: “Peanut butter, almond butter, peanut powder + liquids, whatever. Add a few tablespoons worth.”
  • Protein powder: “Optional; this makes the meal more filling, and if your protein powder has a flavor to it,  it’ll taste yummier I imagine - mine is unflavored though.”
  • Pumpkin or some other filling: “Optional; interestingly, adding pumpkin changed the texture a lot and was quite yummy. I’ll probably do this more often. Add in a few heaping tablespoons, or however much you want. I don’t know. Taste it!”
  • Some liquid, as needed: “Again this totally depends on the amounts of each ingredient so far. You can use any milk, water, even egg whites if you’re protein crazy - but only the stuff from the carton, which is safe to eat raw.”
  • Sugar or sweetener: “Optional; I find I never really need to add any and it’s still satisfying.”

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Stir this all together in your bowl.
  2. Toss in the freezer for at least 2 hours.
  3. If it’s very solid when it comes out, run hot water from the tap over the bottom of the bowl and it’ll come out easily. (I’d also recommend doing this in an ice tray for chocolate ‘bites’, or on parchment paper in bar-shape to make protein bars.)
  4. Top with Greek yogurt and frozen fruit and have it with a hot drink on the side. If you already have these ingredients, then it’s pretty easy!

ANDREW’S CHOSEN RECIPE OF THE WEEK: CARAMEL APPLES!

INGREDIENTS

Carmel Apples

Carmel Apples

  • Bag of Caramel Candies
  • Water
  • Green Apples
  • Wooden Skewers
  • Parchment paper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Wash your apples and stick a wooden skewer through the bottom of each one.
  2. Unwrap your caramel candies and put them in a pot.
  3. Add two tablespoons of water to the pot, and turn the stove onto a medium heat.
  4. Stir the candies and water constantly, until they melt to make a thick liquid with no chunks.
  5. Dip your apples one by one into the caramel liquid. Use a spoon to coat the entire apple with caramel.
  6. Once an apple is completely covered, you can place it on a piece of parchment paper over a pan, skewer-end up, so it can dry.
  7. Once you’ve dipped all of your apples—and one bag of caramel candies should give you about five or six apples—you can put the pan with the parchment paper and apples in the refrigerator. Let the apples cool for about two hours.
  8. Optional: after you’ve completed step 5, you can roll the apple in crushed-up granola or sprinkle sea-salt on the apple or cover the apple with cookie crumbs. Be creative with it!

SOME SPOOKY HALLOWEEN INTERVIEW QUESTIONS FOR KAMRON AND ANDREW

What is your ideal Halloween costume?

Kamron: “Honestly, I’m not really sure. I love me a good spiderman. I also love anything Smash Bros related. One time I dressed up as Link, from the Legend of Zelda.”

Andrew: “For this Halloween, I dressed up as Björk. Specifically, I was Björk from that video where she attacks a reporter in Bangkok (https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1zdfg). I guess that costume was pretty ideal for this Halloween, but I like any costume that’s low-effort and funny.”

What is your favorite Halloween candy?

Kamron: “Again, this is a difficult question. I can definitively say that it’s not candy corn. Maybe this is just me, but candy corn is incredibly delicious for a few bites, but then becomes appallingly bad. Twix and Reese’s Cups are probably my favorites.”

Andrew: “I kind of avoid candy, because I was a bigger kid and do not want to fall into the trap of poor eating habits again. But I do love toffee. A good Heath bar once in a blue moon—which we, of course, had on Saturday—never misses; it just never misses.”

Do you believe in ghosts?

Kamron: “I think the modern construction of ‘ghost’ is a bit too specific for me to confidently believe in. However, I’m a fan of the idea that there is something else, another entity, another form of existence, one that we might not necessarily be aware of.”

Andrew: “I believe in spirits! Maybe not ghosts, but definitely some kind of mutable yet eternal force that animates the human consciousness and body. I’m obsessed with the idea of spirits the same way I’m obsessed with astrology: whether or not these things are real, they’re more fun to think about than most other things, like coursework or the state of the world.”

You’ve reached the end of this Halloween edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter! Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers


October 26, 2020 Edition: This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom. This week’s specially highlighted baker is Matthew Iati, Class of 2022. Matthew’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Easy Pumpkin Pie Cookies!

RECIPE OF THE WEEK: 

EASY PUMPKIN PIE COOKIES

Delicious Cookies by our Baker of the Week

Delicious Cookies by our Baker of the Week!

INGREDIENTS

Cookie Base and Topping

1 pouch (1 lb 1.5 oz) Betty Crocker™ sugar cookie mix

¼ cup cold butter

4 oz (half of 8-oz package) cold cream cheese

Pumpkin Filling

3 oz cream cheese, well-softened 2 tablespoons sugar

3 tablespoons canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix)

2 teaspoons Gold Medal™ all-purpose flour

¼ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Heat oven to 350°F.
  2. Generously spray bottoms and sides of 24 regular-size muffin cups with cooking spray.
  3. Place cookie mix in large bowl.
  4. Cut in butter and 4 oz cream cheese, using pastry blender or fork, until mixture is crumbly. (Do not overmix.)
  5. Reserve 1 cup cookie mixture for topping; set aside.
  6. Firmly press 2 tablespoons remaining cookie mixture evenly into bottom of each muffin cup.
  7. In small bowl, add 3 oz cream cheese and stir until smooth.
  8. Add remaining pumpkin filling ingredients; mix well.
  9. Place 1 rounded teaspoon pumpkin filling in center of each cookie.
  10. Sprinkle each with 2 teaspoons reserved cookie topping.

A LITTLE BIO ON OUR BAKER OF THE WEEK:

Matthew grew up all over the East Coast. He was born in Connecticut, but went to boarding school in NYC at 9 years old, before finding himself at another boarding school in Boston for high school, after which his family moved to Washington, D.C. It’s no surprise that Matthew has no single ‘hometown’, but he definitely associates himself with the east coast.  Matthew was running a lot during the start of this fall semester, but has started formulating new exercises that feel fresh and exciting with the help of our very own Kamron. Of course, Matthew would rather be at school, but he feels that he’s made the best of a bad situation. For about a year and a half at Princeton, Matthew bounced between jobs. It was only until he started working at Murray-Dodge halfway through his sophomore year that he found a job he wanted to work in until he graduated. Matthew’s words: “Love at first cookie.” For Matthew, Murray-Dodge has an iconic status on campus: it’s a casual place to work, it has a distinct and different work environment. What’s not to love about cookies and friends and tea? When asked about his favorite cookie ingredient: “Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh. To be clear, it’s not raisins”. Matthew, though adamant that he’s not a “raisin guy,” loves white chocolate macadamia nut cookies, as well as any cookie with chunks of toffee.Matthew has no aspirations for professional baking. He likes baking with his current roommates, because of his ‘Nona-instinct’. When Matthew’s Nona visits, she brings buckets of Italian cookies: your Nona-instinct makes you want people to gain a few pounds under your watch. For Matthew, feeding people feels good. A part of Matthew wants to disappear into the Andes for six months post-graduation. He wants to seek adventure, life. Matthew did Bridge Year in Bolivia, he did OA, he’s gone on treks with his friends through Alaska and the Amazon. But of all places he’s been the Andes are out of this world. It’s probably his favorite place that he’s ever been.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment. We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself. In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week’s poem, recommended to us by Princeton student Hayden Burt:

POEM OF THE WEEK:  O Cheese by Donald Hall

In the pantry the dear dense cheeses, Cheddars and harsh Lancashires; Gorgonzola with its magnanimous manner; the clipped speech of Roquefort; and a head of Stilton that speaks in a sensuous riddling tongue like Druids.

O cheeses of gravity, cheeses of wistfulness, cheeses that weep continually because they know they will die. O cheeses of victory, cheeses wise in defeat, cheeses fat as a cushion, lolling in bed until noon.

Liederkranz ebullient, jumping like a small dog, noisy; Pont l’Évêque intellectual, and quite well informed; Emmentaler decent and loyal, a little deaf in the right ear; and Brie the revealing experience, instantaneous and profound.

O cheeses that dance in the moonlight, cheeses that mingle with sausages, cheeses of Stonehenge. O cheeses that are shy, that linger in the doorway, eyes looking down, cheeses spectacular as fireworks.

Reblochon openly sexual; Caerphilly like pine trees, small at the timberline; Port du Salut in love; Caprice des Dieux eloquent, tactful, like a thousand-year-old hostess; and Dolcelatte, always generous to a fault.

O village of cheeses, I make you this poem of cheeses, O family of cheeses, living together in pantries, O cheeses that keep to your own nature, like a lucky couple, this solitude, this energy, these bodies slowly dying.

If you’re like Matthew, and you’re looking for a little adventure in life before you settle down into a ‘real job,’ check out the links below! We’ve compiled a list of baking-related internships applicable for Summer 2021. Some are fun, some are serious: either way, you’ll have a great time exploring all the possibilities for a career in the agribusiness!

Cargill Food Science R & D Intern for Summer 2021

Cedar Fair Hospitality Internships 2021 Culinary Arts at Boca Raton October 2021

YummyJobs General Culinary Internships

You’ve reached the end of this fifth edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter! Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait. Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

 


OCTOBER 19 EDITION:  The Murray-Dodge Café has a new edition of its weekly newsletter! Our highlighted baker of the week, Kaylan Fomby, shares a recipe for Zucchini Bread.  Thank you for taking the time to read this fourth edition of the Murray-Dodge Café newsletter! Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee.

This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom. This week’s specially highlighted baker is Kaylan Fomby, class of 2022.  Kaylan’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Zucchini Bread!

Kaylan’s recipe for Zucchini Bread is her aunt’s top-secret recipe. We’ve included a link to a more popular recipe (https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/6698/moms-zucchini-bread/).

A little bio on our Baker of the Week: Kaylan Fomby was born and raised in Alabama, and she moved to the suburbs of Georgia in first grade. While she liked Alabama for being laidback at times, Kaylan’s whole life is in Georgia now. Kaylan wants to shout-out CPS which has been an extremely helpful resource in this time, and is a resource everyone should take advantage of nowadays. Going outside has also helped. Nearby Kaylan's location is a meadow where she hangs out sometimes. She can play guitar, stargaze, talk with God, and just rant about her life. (As long as a cricket tournament isn’t going on.) 

Kaylan has a sentimental reason for her zucchini bread, and a flavor reason. As a child, Kaylan would spend time with her aunt, who also loves to bake. When Kaylan’s aunt would make zucchini bread, Kaylan was disgusted. Zucchini in bread? But once she tried it, she loved it. It tastes great, and it’s easy: you only need a whisk and you’re set.

One of the things Kaylan will remember the most, the thing she tells people when explaining what the cafe is, is that Murray-Dodge is one of the very few spaces to interact with the Princeton Community in two very special ways: firstly, at Murray-Dodge you encounter people you might otherwise never meet, and secondly, the context in which you meet these people is unique to the space itself.

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment.

We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself.  In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place.

This week’s poem: Dark and Lovely After Take-Off (A Future) by Yona Harvey

Nobody straightens their hair anymore. Space trips & limited air supplies will get you conscious quick.

My shea-buttered braids glow planetary as I turn unconcerned, unburned by the pre-take-off bother.

“Leave it all behind,” my mother’d told me, sweeping the last specs of copper thread from her front porch steps &

just as quick, she turned her back to me. Why had she disappeared so suddenly behind that earthly door?

“Our people have made progress, but, perhaps,” she’d said once, “not enough to guarantee safe voyage

to the Great Beyond,” beyond where Jesus walked, rose, & ascended in the biblical tales that survived

above sprocket-punctured skylines &desert-dusted runways jeweled with wrenches & sheet metal scraps.

She’d no doubt exhale with relief to know ancient practice & belief died hard among the privileged, too.

Hundreds of missions passed & failed, but here I was strapped in my seat, anticipating—what exactly?

Curved in prayer or remembrance of a hurt so deep I couldn’t speak. Had that been me slammed to the ground, cuffed,

bulleted with pain as I danced with pain I couldn’t shake loose, even as the cops aimed pistols at me,

my body & mind both disconnected& connected & unable to freeze, though they shouted “freeze!”

like actors did on bad television. They’d watched & thought they recognized me, generic or bland,

without my mother weeping like Mary, Ruby, Idella, Geneava, or Ester stunned with a grief

our own countrymen refused to see, to acknowledge or cease initiating, instigating, &

even mocking in the social networks, ignorant frays bent and twisted like our DNA denied

but thriving and evident nonetheless—You better believe the last things I saw when far off lifted

were Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa Africa…

& though it pained me to say it sooner: the unmistakable absence of the Great Barrier Reef.

 

Like Kaylan says, going outside nowadays is imperative. Included below are some easy recipes you can enjoy outdoors at a ~properly socially-distanced~ gathering with family!

https://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/g4308/campfire-desserts/

http://www.lovetheoutdoors.com/camping/dessert_recipes.htm (We really wanna try the M&M Smores)

https://veganonboard.com/campfire-bread-on-a-stick-recipe/ (Who doesn’t love bread on a stick?)

You’ve reached the end of this fourth edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter!  Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait.  Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

P.S.  If you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu

 


OCTOBER 12, 2020 EDITION: Though we can’t resume Murray-Dodge in-person yet, we hope our newsletters bring you a tiny memory of fresh-baked cookies, time with friends, nights of crazy studying, or just chilling with some free coffee. This week, we’re proud to present another round of a Recipe of the Week from our highlighted Baker of the Week! We also provide a link below which can alleviate some of the quarantine boredom. This week’s specially highlighted baker is Amina Elgamal, class of 2022. Amina’s chosen Recipe of the Week is the Simple Ten-Step Pancakes! For those of us who really want to bake but can’t stand all the measuring and pouring and messiness, this recipe for the easiest fluffy pancakes you’ve ever made in ten, simple steps needs to be your go-to.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
    Pancakes!

    Delicious Pancakes!

  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for cooking
  • Powdered sugar or maple syrup, for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Stir together the flour, the sugar, the baking powder, and salt in a large bowl.
  2. Mix in the milk, the eggs, and the vegetable oil. A few lumps are fine!
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat while the batter settles.
  4. Swirl 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil around the pan to coat it.
  5. Add 3 separate portions of the batter to the pan, using 2 tablespoons of batter for each portion.
  6. Cook until bubbles appear on the surface, the edges begin to look dry, and the bottoms are golden-brown. Around 3 minutes.
  7. Flip the pancakes and cook until the second sides are golden-brown, 2 to 3 minutes more.
  8. Transfer to a warm oven or plate.
  9. Smear a thin layer of butter or margarine in between each layer of your pancake stack.
  10. Repeat using more oil until you are out of batter.

A LITTLE BIO ON OUR BAKER OF THE WEEK: Amina grew up in Dublin, Ohio, a place she describes as fun and chill, although with not much to do there. Her parents are both from Egypt: her dad teaches electrical engineering at Ohio State University and her mom works a consulting job for medical business. She wasn’t aware of it, but Amina is a Gemini. We read her the typical Gemini personality traits and asked her if she identified with them. Her response? “Give me a couple months and I’ll get back to you.” Amina holds a firm stance when it comes to the ideal mix-in: Chocolate-chips, 100%. The chocolate-chip cookie is the most convenient vessel for eating a melted chocolate bar. Princeton selects for the trait of competition, according to Amina. You can feel that pressure in a library. Murray-Dodge had good energy: it was the place where your friends could come and sit and chat, while you all ate cookies. Amina relaxes by making things. Though baking alone can be painful, making cookies is meditative in a way. It turns the brain off. She recommends finding a place where you can assign the role of relaxation. Now, in quarantine, we take our exams in our bedrooms. You can’t be stuck in one place all the time, Amina says. For post-graduation, Amina is thinking maybe graduate school, maybe employment, maybe law  school. She thinks on how the pandemic will affect the social lives of young adults: if the job sector shifts home, how will the timeline of our lives be redirected?

At Murray-Dodge, we believe that cookies and baking and the café atmosphere don’t just feed the body. They feed the soul, too. And, being so far away from the Princeton campus and our normal routines, our souls need a bit of nourishment. We’re proud to start including a Poem of the Week. We hope this weekly poem will be another resource among the many Princeton offers to help you stay grounded and live for yourself. In times of global darkness, poetry always finds a place. This week’s poem:

EN SU LLAMA MORTAL BY PABLO NERUDA

En su llama mortal la luz te envuelve. Absorta, pálida doliente, así situada contra las viejas helices del crepúsculo que en torno a ti da vueltas.

Muda, mi amiga, sola en lo solitario de esta hora de muertes y llena de las vidas del fuego, pura heredera del día destruido.

Del sol cae un racimo en tu vestido oscuro. De la noche las grandes raíces crecen de subito desde tu alma, y a lo exterior regresan las cosas en ti ocultas, de modo que un pueblo pálido y azul de ti recién nacido se alimenta.

Oh grandiosa y fecunda y magnética esclava del círculo que en negro y dorado sucede: erguida, trata y logra una creación tan viva que sucumben sus flores, y llena es de tristeza.

THE LIGHT WRAPS YOU - TRANS. W.S. MERWIN

The light wraps you in its mortal flame. Abstracted pale mourner, standing that way against the old propellers of the twilight that revolves around you.

Speechless, my friend, alone in the loneliness of this hour of the dead and filled with the lives of fire, pure heir of the ruined day.

A bough of fruit falls from the sun on your dark garment. The great roots of night grow suddenly from your soul, and the things that hide in you come out again so that a blue and pallid people, your newly born, takes nourishment.

Oh magnificent and fecund and magnetic slave of the circle that moves in turn through black and gold rise, lead and possess a creation so rich in life that its flowers perish, and it is full of sadness.

If you want more poetry, check out All Hallows by Louise Glück. Here at Murray-Dodge, we have to celebrate her recent win of the Nobel Prize in Literature. She is the 16th woman to win the Nobel for Literature out of a list of 113 recipients. She is the third American to receive the prize in the past 30 years, a short list which includes Bob Dylan and our very own Toni Morrison. Our recommended poem shows off her subtle voice, her moody atmospheres, and her introspective gaze. It is the perfect poem for mid-October.

If you’re interested in doing more baking than reading—after all, as Amina says, sometimes you have to turn off your brain and work with your hands—check out the links below! This especially goes out to everyone who’s had a rough midterm season. Nobody told us Zoom University was going to be this way. Sometimes, you gotta watch YouTube and procrastinate, you just gotta.

The chemistry of cookies – Stephanie Warren (4.30 mins)

4 levels of Chocolate Chip Cookies: Amateur to Food Scientist | Epicurious (10.13 mins) – At Murray-Dodge, we love the Epicurious channel on YouTube!

Pastry Chef Attempts to Make Gourmet Takis | Gourmet Makes | Bon Appétit (33.00 mins) – We also really love Takis.

You’ve reached the end of this third edition of the Murray-Dodge Newsletter! Though we can’t wait to resume on-campus baking, it may be a while. We hope this week’s Highlighted Baker, Recipe, Poem, and fun activity links can tide you over while you wait. Comfy, cozy, come whenever: the Murray-Dodge Café is still going strong, pandemic or no!

With love from us to you,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers

P.S.   If you have a baking-related poem—or any poem at all—you want to show off, send it our way! You can email it to us through andrewtye@princeton.edu


October 5, 2020 Edition: This week’s specially highlighted Baker is Nisha Lakhiani, class of 2021. Nisha’s chosen Recipe of the Week is Pumpkin Bread. With September slowly cooling down into October, Nisha wanted a baked good with an atmosphere for autumn!

Recipe of the Week: Pumpkin Bread (in one bowl)

Pumpkin Bread

Pumpkin Bread

1 1/2 cup pumpkin purée

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 vegetable oil

1/3 cup milk

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

Make sure everything is mixed well together

In another bowl:

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp salt

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg (optional)

1/2 tsp ground ginger (optional) Mix everything together.

Gradually pour dry flour mixture into pumpkin mixture, stirring well before you add more into the bowl. Stir until all ingredients are completely combined. Adding nuts is optional!

Grease an 8x4 loaf pan and pour mixture in.

Bake at 350F for 55 minutes, or until done and toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Let cool for 5-10 minutes before removing from pan and let cool on a rack. You can serve with a nice homemade glaze, cream cheese frosting, or just by itself if you like it simple!

NOTES: if you don’t have nutmeg or ginger, or many spices, or you don’t want to buy a whole container, you can buy pumpkin pie mix at the grocery store, instead of plain pumpkin purée. The pie mix is essentially the same, but it comes prepared with spices already. That’s what I did. But I added some extra cinnamon and vanilla in there anyway!

A little bit of a bio for the Baker of the Week:

Nisha was born and raised in Texas, just like her mom. Her dad moved to Texas from India in his 20s, and the rest was history. Since she was a freshman, the cafe was Nisha’s go-to spot to hang out and do schoolwork, even if she wasn’t working shifts. What Nisha likes most about the café is how it can be so different for so many people. For first-timers, it has surprise to it. For regulars, it’s their cozy spot to retreat. Despite the Pumpkin Bread, Nisha’s biggest hit in the café was a pistachio chocolate-chip cookie she experimented with her sophomore year. To cope with quarantine, Nisha first made it a priority to stay occupied. She learned a dance, exercised, binged TV shows, and even started studying for the LSAT! But Nisha finally landed on cooking as a way to destress, spend more time with her mom, and try out new recipes. Nisha thinks of making food as a kind of love language. It’s a way to bring family and friends together.

And as an activity for the week, check out studentrecipes.com. The website has tons of recipes, articles, and online communities for college students who need to cook for themselves. It’s perfect for the Princeton student who just moved out of their parents’ house. If you liked our newsletter, stay tuned for more throughout the semester! We’re going to have more Recipes of the Week, more featured Bakers, more fun links and activities, and we’ll even be hosting competitions as the semester goes on. Though Murray-Dodge can’t be a physical home for students this semester, it can still be a community. We hope this newsletter will tide over those upperclassmen who are dying for a cookie and introduce the new freshmen to one of the happiest spots on campus.

Happy Baking,

Andrew T, Kamron S, and the Murray-Dodge Bakers


 

Murray-Dodge Café

Murray-Dodge Café Entrance facing the Art Museum

The Murray-Dodge Café is an informal, underground meeting place that offers FREE fresh-baked, homemade cookies, coffee and tea.  All Princeton University students are welcome!   Our dedicated and experienced student staff helps to make this a great place to take a study break, meet some new friends, or reconnect with old ones!  The Café also hosts special events such as musical performances and poetry readings.   Our entrance is located on the Art Museum side of Dodge Hall.  The kindest place on campus!  However, the Café is currently closed due to COVID-19.

 

Murray-Dodge Café Holiday Fun - December  2017

Murray-Dodge Café Holiday Fun - December  2017

Murray-Dodge Café Holiday Fun - December  2017

 

Murray-Dodge Café staff pumpkin picking - Fall 2017

Murray-Dodge Café staff pumpkin picking - Fall 2017

Murray-Dodge Café staff pumpkin picking - Fall 2017

Interior of the Cafe 

Murray-Dodge Café